Rooftop – Where India Inspires Creativity

Indian Floor Art: A Deep Dive Into 6 Diverse Art Forms

Picture this: You’re at a lavishly decorated venue where a wedding is being held. You walk in and are dazzled by a gigantic, sprawling design created on the floor of the entrance. Flowers, glitter, acrylic paint, and other contemporary mediums are used to create semi-permanent floor decor- and this is very popular in India.

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The Intricate Traditions Of Tikuli Art

Teep, Bottus, Bindis, Tiklis—whatever you call them—you must be familiar with the dot-shaped facial decoration that Indian women flaunt on their foreheads. Did you know that these dots were the origin of an intricate and detailed art form? We’re talking about the uniquely Indian Tikuli art, of course! The process of making tiklis led to the creation of this woman-centric folk art form.

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What Sets Kota Paintings Apart From the Bundi School of Painting

You may have heard of the Kota-Bundi School of Miniature Painting, but you may also have heard of Kota and Bundi paintings separately. So are they the same? Or are there noticeable differences? Actually, Kota paintings are an offshoot of the Bundi school. They are different in quite significant ways, and this is why, while earlier paintings may be called Kota-Bundi, the miniatures of later periods are referred to as either one or the other.

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Bundi Paintings: The Incredible Miniature Paintings Of Rajasthan

Indian Miniature paintings are as varied in style and subject matter as they are intricate. Different schools of painting developed different styles and methods. The elaborate floral depictions of Mughal miniatures are different from the delicate portrayals of women in the Kangra School. Similarly, Bundi paintings are known for their depictions of lush vegetation, court and hunting scenes, and lovers.

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How Rooftop Helps Artists Showcase Indian Artwork

As a kid, you might have dreamed of becoming an artist when you grew up. But if you ever told your relatives you wanted to study art, you would get the response, ‘Beta, you’ll starve. Following your dreams isn’t that easy’. Art is no longer a dreamer’s profession, but not anymore. Now artists know that they need to turn passion into profit. Mere ‘appreciation’ and ‘exposure’ as payment doesn’t satisfy them. The demand for Indian art has increased, and so has the value of Indian artwork.

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The Diverse Tapestry of Indian Folk and Tribal Art Forms

India is a land of diversity, replete with multi-cultural communities, rich customs, and elaborate traditions. Almost every community came to express its unique perceptions and rituals through visual art forms. Through the passage of time, society developed, and factors such as religion, geography, politics, economic conditions, and social norms all moulded the communal perceptions of art. This led to the development of many Indian folk and tribal art forms, each with distinct styles, motifs, and legacies.

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Symbolism in Aipan Art

In the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, you will see women decorating the walls of their homes, pieces of fabric, or even paper with Aipan, a traditional art form Kumaon women have been practicing for centuries. The practice of Aipan Art reached its height during the rule of the Chand Dynasty in Kumaon. Originating in Almora, the art form has slowly found its way into many parts of the state as members of the Kumaoni community migrated and took with them the art they practice.

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Discovering Rajasthani Wildlife in Miniature Paintings

Studying the Rajasthani Wildlife in Miniature Paintings You might be aware that traditional Indian art often favours stylisation over realism. However, each stylised element is an interpretation of real life. So where does reality end and fantasy begin? Do the Miniature paintings of Rajasthan display any realistic elements at all? Studying the stylisation of Rajasthani

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Patna Kalam

Decline of Patna Kalam in the Modern Indian Art Discourse

Introduction Patna Kalam is often considered a part of Company painting. However, this categorisation becomes problematic when it questions the authenticity of the art form to be Indian. Patna School of Art is a hybrid of Mughal and Rajput court paintings and European techniques. A part of the artworks of Patna artists did target European

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Pinguli Chitrakathi: Maharashtra’s Lesser Known Tribal Art Form

When you think of the tribal art of Maharashtra, you inevitably think of Warli painting. Its commercial success has put Indian tribal art on the global map. But did you know that another style of tribal painting also originated in Maharashtra? Chitrakathi is a 400-year-old art form that began as a visual aid for the performing arts and evolved into a distinct art form.

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